Git in Visual Studio: Prevent Fast-Forward Merge

A useful feature of git merge is the –no-ff flag. What it does is always generate a merge commit, even if it was a fast-forward (trivial) merge.

The main point of using this feature is avoid losing information about the historical existence of a certain branch, and (to some degree) being able to associate commits with the branches they were created on.

Turns out, this feature existed in Team Explorer for quite some time, but you would never guessed it if you didn’t stumble upon this User Voice entry.

By unchecking the “commit changes after merging” option, you’ll prevent a fast-forward merge and have the ability supply a custom commit message.

Why not just call it ‘prevent fast-forward merge’? 🙂

 

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Python in Visual Studio 2015

When I first heard that Visual Studio 2015 is going to support developing with Python, I wasn’t sure how to react. Microsoft? Python? it just doesn’t seem related. I was very skeptical about working in Python within Visual Studio.

Recently I started a new pet project in GitHub to play around with VS integration to GitHub. So I figured, let’s include some Python code just to see how it feels working with Python in VS.

And it feels great, actually! Visual Studio users would feel right at home with IntelliSense-like auto completion and tooltips, debugging capabilities, unit testing with Test Explorer, advanced searching and editing, and more. I would dare comparing it to some of the best Python IDEs out there like PyCharm. GitHub integration also work seamlessly.

This Python support (a.k.a Python Tools for Visual Studio) is included in the free Visual Studio 2015 Community edition, and even available as open source on GitHub.

Microsoft! on GitHub! Times are changing, indeed.